I AM FULL THROTTLE

The ultimate imaging machine has advanced: Nikon introduces its new FX-format flagship, the D4S

 D4sRRPs

Body only: £5,199.99 / €6,199.00

Sales start date: 6th March 2014

London, UK, 25th February 2014    Nikon today announces the D4S, a new 16.2 megapixel FX-format flagship camera built to keep professionals ahead of the game.

The ultimate imaging machine has advanced: as the successor to Nikon’s acclaimed D4, everything about the D4S powers exceptional images at exceptional speed. An expanded ISO range and EXPEED 4 image processing take low light photography to another level, making the D4S a master of the dark as well as the light. Advances to AF performance offer improved acquisition and tracking at 11 fps, plus much finer control over the AF area with the new Group Area AF mode. Nikon’s RAW Size S file format accelerates image transfer onto networks and a Gigabit 100/1000TX Ethernet port enables ultra-fast connection.

 Hiro Sebata, Professional Product Manager at Nikon UK, comments: The Nikon D4S follows the success of the D4 and brings with it a new level of performance designed to meet the needs of the most demanding photographers.”

He adds: “Nikon engineers have taken on board valuable feedback from professional users in order to implement a wealth of improvements that will make all the difference to professionals working in the intensely competitive fields of sports, press, and nature photography. Equipped to power ahead in the most challenging environments, the D4S ensures serious photographers stay ahead of the game.”

Built upon success 

Moving beyond the limits its predecessor was built to push, the D4S blazes a new trail for high-speed professional image making. The camera’s revamped sensor offers the ultimate image quality, and the expanded ISO range of 100–25600 is extendable up to an industry-leading 409600 (equivalent). Nikon’s new EXPEED 4 image processing engine boosts the camera’s overall performance to a whole new level, vastly improving image rendering and ISO performance. A true master of the dark as well as of the light,sophisticated localised noise reduction, edge sharpening and tone control ensure the D4S delivers outstanding results in the kind of ‘dirty’ low light conditions many sports and news photographers are confronted with. The burst rate of 11 fps is not compromised by ISO settings or lens choice, and details are rendered sharp and exceptionally well defined even when Noise Reduction filtering is applied.  As with the D4, the D4S is built to sustain peak performance in the most demanding environmental conditions imaginable.The camera is protected by a tough weather-sealed full metal body and features subtle details that make all the difference to handling: changes to button layout and re-shaped control buttons improve operation in damp conditions whilst the re-contoured design and smoother grip make it easier to hold out in the field…

Full throttle: stop at nothing

Everything about the D4S is built around the need for speed. In a world where the speed of transmission and networking has become as important as megapixels and ISO settings, the D4S delivers on every count. The frame-per-second with autofocus tracking has increased from 10 fps to 11 fps, making the D4S the fastest autofocus D-SLR-camera in Nikon’s history. The cameraimplements a Gigabit 100/1000TX Ethernet port and offers a new RAW Size S option for accelerated image transfer. When milliseconds matter, the shutter’s 42 ms lag can gain you the critical edge, taking pictures in less than the blink of an eye; and a completely new shutter and mirror mechanism reduces mirror bounce, delivering a stable viewfinder image with minimal viewfinder blackout when shooting at high speed.

 Bettering the best: AF advances

The D4S takes the class-leading accuracy and usability of Nikon’s renowned 51-point AF system and advances it further. In addition to improved lock-on, expanded ‘Store by orientation’, and new options for AF mode restrictions, the D4S boasts a brand new Group Area AF mode. Designed to allow much finer control over the size of the autofocus area, Group Area AF constantly monitors five different AF fields, which can be shifted across the 51-point array as composition demands. Shooting in this mode enables fast moving subjects to be tracked with phenomenal precision over long distances, and greatly improves acquisition and background isolation when shooting subjects that are comparatively small and close to a high-contrast or distracting background. As with the D4, the AF system inside the D4S is configurable in 9-point, 21-point and 51-point coverage settings and sensitive down to -2 EV (ISO 100, 20°C/68°F).

 Multi-area D-Movie evolves

For moviemaking in diverse conditions, the D4S offers broadcast-quality video in multiple frame formats and boasts a range of operational enhancements that allow more control over footage while filming and improve sound recording. D-movies are now possible at 50p/60p, and photographers can set sensitivity and select maximum ISO in M mode, plus select the sensor crop format, control power aperture, and fix shutter speed. In addition, Nikon’s 3D noise reduction reduces random noise and noise flicker when filming at high sensitivities. As with the D4, the D4S offers three sensor crop formats, FX, DX, and native crop (approximately 2.7x) and uncompressed full-resolution HDMI output to external devices. You can simultaneously record full resolution HD movies in-camera and with an external recorder via HDMI (an HDMI cable clip is provided with the camera for a secure connection). Sound recording has improved thanks to more options for audio control, including the option to select the sound range (wide/voice), and reduce wind noise when recording with the built-in microphone.

Summary of key features:

 Revamped 16.2-MP FX-format sensor: offers the ultimate in image quality and excellent cropping flexibility.

Phenomenal light sensitivity: ISO range of 100–25600 is extendable up to an industry-leading 409600 (equivalent).

11 FPS with AF: 11 fps in FX format with AE/AF superior to the D4.

EXPEED 4: boosts the camera’s overall performance to a whole new level.

Multi-CAM3500FX 51-point AF system configurable in 9-point, 21-point and 51-point coverage settings and sensitive down to -2 EV (ISO 100, 20°C/68°F).

AF advances: improved lock-on, new options for AF mode restrictions, plus the new Group Area AF mode.

Multi-area D-Movie: Full HD (1080p) movies in FX- and DX-format at 60p/50p/30p/ 25p/24p frame rates. Offers three sensor crop formats FX, DX and native crop (approximately 2.7x) and clean HDMI-out. Access the ISO range from ISO 200 up and control shutter speed, aperture and audio levels while filming. Nikon’s 3D noise reduction reduces random noise, and the camera offers sophisticated options for audio control.

Tough in the field: weather-sealed full metal body.

Fast track: Gigabit 100/1000TX Ethernet port and RAW Size S file format for accelerated image transfer. Compatible with Nikon’s WT-5 Wireless Transmitter.

Colour adjustable monitor: anti-reflective 8 cm (3.2-in.), 921k-dot LCD monitor that lets you push the colour balance and brightness in any direction.

Fast durable shutter: Kevlar/carbon fibre-composite shutter unit with 42 ms shutter lag, standard life cycle rating of 400,000 releases and a shutter speed of 1/8000 to 30s, with flash synchronization at up to 1/250 sec. A new shutter and mirror mechanism delivers a stable viewfinder image with minimal blackout during high-speed shooting.

Spot White Balance metering: easily acquire manual, pre-set White Balance data based on the selected area within the frame: the size of the area acquired can be retained even when the image is enlarged, and consecutive data acquisition is possible.

High-capacity EL-18a battery: ultra-compact and lightweight lithium-Ion rechargeable battery with a capacity of 2500 mAh (10.8V).

Storage media: two card slots—one for high-speed CF (UDMA 7) cards, and one for high-speed, high-capacity XQD cards.

Happy Birthday Apple. The entire video above was shot on the 24th January in 15 different locations worldwide using iPhone 5s. Over 70 hours of video was captured by videographers on 100 iPhones. The individual videos were sent over the internet to LA for editing by a team of 21 editors. The final result is a spectacular 1.28 minute video.

Carol-Cat

A  shot by photo-i reader Carol King. Carol was doing some gardening when her cat popped her head over the fence, with a swift action Carol captured this lovely photo. It pays to keep you camera handy at all times. Shot with a Canon G10 on fully Auto (yes Auto can work well for quick grab shots)

for-sale
29th November 2013, Marly Switzerland. Today ILFORD Imaging Switzerland GmbH announced that the company is again facing liquidity issues and is no longer able to honour its full financial obligations. The Managing Directors have already informed the employees and have sent a letter to the court of Fribourg declaring insolvency.

In June 2013, ILFORD Imaging experienced a liquidity issue after the former shareholder Paradigm Global Partners, a UK based financial investor suddenly withdrew from the business. Since then the management took over the company to secure the business short-term and also to find a new long-term investor.

The new shareholders, Paul Willems and Jean Marc Métrailler, initiated the sale of land owned by the real estate company ILFORD Property and invested these funds in ILFORD Imaging in order to provide sufficient liquidity to bridge the time until a new investor could be found. The ILFORD investment opportunity was presented to more than 20 interested parties from all over the world. Unfortunately, a new investor for ILFORD Imaging has not yet been found and the last potential investor pulled out earlier this week.

After the liquidity issues during the summer, it was challenging to re-start the business, as many existing customers began to buy products from competitors, which resulted in a large negative impact on the company’s revenue. In addition, ILFORD had to operate in a particular difficult market where demand is decreasing and manufacturers compete on low prices due to excess capacity. Furthermore, most suppliers would only deliver raw materials against payment in advance. These circumstances, along with the fact that the company had to replenish its inventories, and after payment of the late salaries of June and July, required additional cash.

The restructuring measures that were taken in August 2013 were necessary to improve the competitiveness of the company medium- to long-term. However these measures have not been fully effective yet and the impact will only be realised in the first quarter 2014.

The management is working closely with the State and the appropriate authorities in order to minimise the negative impact on all parties involved. No further information can be provided until the decision of the court is made and the next steps are understood.

About ILFORD
ILFORD Imaging Switzerland GmbH is a sophisticated multi-layer coating company that is known worldwide for its premium quality inkjet photo paper. The company is a world leader in nanotechnology and multi-layer curtain coating. In addition to inkjet photo paper and traditional colour films for the professional market, the coating technology can be used in a broad range of applications including optical films for TV or LED lamps, and sensors for medical equipment. The company also develops and manufactures ink and dyes for the printing industry.

Up and coming British film talent celebrated as the 2013 Virgin Media Shorts winner is announced

Judges Shane Meadows, David Tennant and Mat Whitecross attend star-studded ceremony at the BFI IMAX

 

 Created to help uncover some of the best up and coming British filmmaking talent, the UK’s biggest short film competition – Virgin Media Shorts – has revealed the winner of this year’s competition.

Nimer Rashed secured the Grand Prize with his film Touch, after being selected by industry heavyweights including BAFTA Award winning director, Shane Meadows (This is England, Dead Man’s Shoes, Made of Stone), respected actor of stage and screen, David Tennant and director Mat Whitecross (Spike Island, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll) as their worthy winner.

Nimer was presented with his prize by Shane Meadows, which includes £30,000 funding towards his next film, at a star-studded awards ceremony at the BFI (British Film Institute) IMAX in London’s Waterloo. The event was attended by an array of stars including Katherine Kelly (Mr Selfridge), Catherine Steadman (Fresh Meat), Olivia Halinan (Sugar Rush), Shelley Conn (By Any Means, Marchlands), Sienna Guillory (Luther, Love Actually) and was hosted by film buff, author and presenter Danny Wallace. Guests then spent the night dancing the night away to top tunes spun by musician and Pulp front man, Jarvis Cocker.

Costing nothing to make, Touch is a poignant reflection on the relationship and love between two people over the course of a life time, told almost entirely through the touch of their hands – from their first connection through to their final farewell. The piece was inspired by EM Forster’s phrase ‘only connect’ and after many weeks of pre-production, shot over one sunny weekend in various locations, including a park, church and restaurant.

The film-maker Nimer, commentated: “Filming Touch was a real labour of love and winning Virgin Media Shorts 2013 is a dream come true. The competition always has a really high standard of talent and entering the project does a great deal to elevate the short film form. I wanted to make something that would be really cinematic, where images would tell a story on their own, largely without dialogue. It was an exciting challenge to explain exactly how the film would work, without either a traditional script or storyboards.”

Shane Meadows comments: “The creativity and breath of talent displayed in the shortlist this year made my job as a judge very tricky. Touch is a beautiful short that manages to convey a range of emotions in a simple and powerful way. It tells a story that we all at some point have been affected by.”

Dana Strong, chief operating officer at Virgin Media, said: “Here at Virgin Media, we’re extremely proud to be supporting such talented up and coming British film-makers. Now in its sixth year, the competition has gone from strength to strength, providing British film talent with a real opportunity to step up in a challenging industry. This year has been another fantastic competition with Nimer’s short film demonstrating his talent for storytelling in an emotionally charged and beautifully shot short film.”

In addition to the £30,000 funding for his next project, Nimer will be able to benefit from mentoring and support from the BFI Film Fund, the UK’s largest public film fund and a backer of recent British films – a practice that has been provided to previous winners, such as BAFTA nominated Luke Snellin, 2013 Virgin Media Shorts judge – Jason Wingard – and last year’s grand prize-winner Jennifer Sheridan, who has just submitted the script for her next film to the BFI.

Both the Nikon People’s Choice Award Winner, which gave film fans from across the UK, the chance to support their favourite, by voting on Twitter and Facebook, and The TiVo® Award Winner, as voted for by Virgin Media customers via their TiVo box, were also announced at last night’s ceremony. Just Say Hi, directed by John McPhail on a budget of just £200, did the double, scooping both prizes, receiving £5,000 film funding, mentoring from the BFI and Nikon digital SLR camera equipment worth up to £5,000.

Nikon ambassador, John Wright said: “It’s been a pleasure to be on the judging panel for this year’s awards and to be involved in a competition that supports emerging film making talent. I’ve been so impressed with the quality of entries and hope that more people are inspired to give film making a go.

Nimer’s winning short was outstanding; a really well thought out piece of work – a deserved winner, well done.”

Virgin Media Shorts will continue to give all shortlisted film makers the opportunity to have their work showcased to millions of people across the country through cinemas nationwide, on TV (showcased in a dedicated app on Virgin Media’s TiVo® service) and online. A unique opportunity for those trying to break into such a notoriously competitive industry.

For more information about Virgin Media Shorts and to watch the winning films visit www.virginmediashorts.co.uk.

The shortlist, which consists of successful entries from all over the UK, were:

●     The Big Day – by Karl Falconer

●     Touch – by Nimer Rashad

●     A Favour – by James Bradley

●     Brando-ing – by Malcolm Roy Greenhill

●     Spring Clean – by Ed Clifton, Ed Daggett and Michael Stranney

●     The Man Who Couldn’t Stop Putting Things In Bins – by Louis Paxton and Patrick Kondracki

●     Stick Out – by Anthony Farquhar-Smith

●     RVG – by Ian Bucknole

●     Handuken – by Chris Chung

●     Homey – by Ben Garfield

●     Niche in the Market – by Rod Main

●     Just Say Hi – by John McPhail

●     Jetpack Jack – by Oliver Lee (the ‘Lucky 13th’)

The full list of judges include:

  • Shane Meadows – (BAFTA award-winning director and screenwriter)
  • David Tennant – (actor of stage and screen)
  • Mat Whitecross – (director of Spike Island)
  • James King (film critic and presenter of The Movie Show on ITV2)
  • Jason Wingard – (film director and winner of Virgin Media Shorts 2011)
  • Dana Strong – (chief operating officer at Virgin Media)
  • Chris Collins – (Production & Development Executive at the BFI’s Film Fund)
  • John Wright – (Nikon ambassador)

I AM PURE PHOTOGRAPHY

Nikon unveils the Df: a retro-styled high-end D-SLR

Nikon Df

It was just a matter of time before camera manufacturers came back around to putting the emphasis back to taking photographs. For the past ten years we have been inundated with cameras boasting higher specifications after specifications, albeit very impressive specifications. Today Nikon officially announced their latest Digital camera the Df, this draws on Nikon’s heritage with producing high quality cameras that have inspired generations of photographers.

The Df is modelled on Nikon’s highly popular FM/FM2 camera, it contains all the bells and whistles of their digital camera range and at the same time it has the feel and handling of a traditional film camera. All past Nikkor lenses are compatible, with the exception of a handful of specialist lenses which require the mirror to be locked up. The lens mount has a coupling pin which indexes the aperture on Ai lenses, for non Ai lenses the coupling pin can be locked up and metering is achieved through stopped down metering.

The Df does not have any video capability, it is intended for pure photography. I was rather surprised at this omission, yet could also see the reasoning behind this. The Df is intended for those photographers who are passionate about their photography.

Specification wise, the camera has a 16.2 megapixel Full frame CMOS sensor, maybe Nikon should have gone for a higher pixel count for those photographers who demand the highest quality photos. ISO covers a range from 100 – 12,800 which is extendable up to  ISO 204,800 – now you can really photograph that black cat in a coal cellar without flash.

The CPU engine includes Expeed 3 for fast image processing, something that a photographer will not need to think or care about, it just works in the same way that your car does when you turn the key. Expeed 3 delivers results without second thought, you only need to think about the creative content of your photos.

The Df does look an interesting camera but also carries a hefty price tag. Nikon sees this camera as a desirable piece of equipment that a passionate photographer may want. The only problem that I see, comes from Nikon themselves, they have a fabulous line up of Digital cameras including the D800 which has a much higher specification and video capability all at a lower price point. Time will tell if the DF captures the imagination of the photographer or if it will be something for the camera collectors shelf.

Read the full specifications in the press release below

Nikon-Df-top

Nikon UK Press Release

RRP: £2749.99 / 3350 (Selected retailers only)

Sales start date: 28th November 2013

Available in black or silver

 

London, UK, 5th November 2013 Nikon today announces the Df, a new  D-SLR dedicated to pure photography that boast looks inspired by Nikon’s iconic 35mm film cameras and technology from the latest professional models.

The Df expresses a passion for photography in both form and function. Sitting proudly in a class of its own, this retro-style camera paints a unique picture against the uniformity of modern-day D-SLRs. Equipped with the same image sensor as Nikon’s flagship D4, it offers uncompromised dynamic range and phenomenal light sensitivity. The Nikon Df is the lightest of Nikon’s current FX-format models, yet features the durable build and reliable operation that you’d expect from a high-end Nikon camera. Perfect for camera purists and design aficionados alike, the Nikon Df is set to capture the hearts and minds of photographers who are as passionate about their camera as they are about their art

Hiro Sebata, Product Manager at Nikon UK, says: “The concept for this camera was based on the emotion of photography and will appeal to passionate photographers who enjoy pure photography and cherish their cameras, as well as their images, old and new.

“The stylish, classic design of the new Df reflects Nikon’s heritage, whilst its capability to produce flagship quality images allows photographers to focus on the creative aspect of photography. This new camera is in a class of its own; it’s an emotive product that will inspire you from the moment you pick it up.”

Pure photography

At the heart of the Df is the same 16.2-megapixel FX-format CMOS sensor and EXPEED 3 image processor found in Nikon’s professional flagship camera, the D4. Such a powerful combination of professional grade technology ensures the Df delivers superior image integrity under a broad range of lighting conditions. Photographs boast faithful, well- saturated colour and natural depth, even when shooting at the high end of the ISO range, which extends to a phenomenal ISO 204,800 (equivalent).

DF Sensor

DF Sensor

16.2-megapixel FX-format (full-frame) CMOS sensor: Thanks to an optimised balance between the size of the FX-format sensor (36.0×23.9 mm) and an effective pixel count of 16.2 million pixels, the Df delivers images with stunning depth and detail, low noise, and wide dynamic range.

Superb light sensitivity: With ISO 100–12,800, extendable up to 204,800 (equivalent), the Df retains Nikon’s status as the sovereign of low-light shooting . Finely detailed images with minimal noise are possible even when you shoot under challenging lighting conditions.

EXPEED 3: From image processing to transfer, Nikon’s image-processing engine makes light work of data-rich tasks without sacrificing speed and quality. The 16-bit image processing offers optimal colour, perfect tonality, and minimised noise throughout the frame, delivering smooth gradations with abundant detail and tone all the way up the scale to pure white, even when shooting in JPEG. In addition, the powerful EXPEED 3 is fast, accurate, and exceptionally energy efficient, prolonging the camera’s ability to endure extended shooting.

Fast performance: Start-up time is approximately 0.14 s* and the shutter-release time lag is just 0.052 s* . High-speed continuous shooting is available at up to 5.5 fps in both FX and DX formats.

Iconic Nikon design: Tactile precision mechanics and flagship image quality

Nikon-Df

The classic Nikon F and new Nikon Df

The Nikon Df may incorporate looks from Nikon’s iconic 35mm film SLRs, but it’s built to handle the demands of modern digital photographers. When you’re passionate about photography, you know that taking the picture is as rewarding as enjoying the final images, and the Df boasts the kind of rugged build and superior ergonomics that has made the Nikon name synonymous with durability and reliability. Crafted to respond perfectly to your command, this camera will delight the senses of any photographer who’s passionate about still images—and cameras.

Elegant mechanical dials: Comfort meets control with knurled mechanical dials that make operation simple and secure. The dials let you set ISO sensitivity, exposure compensation, exposure mode, and release mode independently, enabling you to access all parameters relevant to still photography without using the camera’s menu.

Full-frame portability: Experience the creative thrill of FX-format photography wherever you go, thanks to a compact body that weighs approximately 710 g without the battery. Built to withstand severe conditions, the camera features tough yet lightweight magnesium alloy top, bottom, and rear covers, and is weather-sealed to the same degree as Nikon’s D800 D-SLR for enhanced resistance to moisture and dust.

 Durable shutter unit: The highly accurate shutter unit has been tested to 150,000 cycles, with a maximum shutter speed of 1/4,000 s and flash synchronisation at up to 1/200 s.

Self-cleaning sensor unit: Reduces the accumulation of dust in front of the image sensor.

Energy-saving design: Achieves approximately 1,400 shots* (when using the EN-EL14a battery, in single-frame mode).

Classic details: The Df body comes in classic black, or silver with black highlights. The textured grip, mechanical dials, and flat top-panel hark back to Nikon’s iconic silver-halide film SLR cameras such as the F2 and F3, and the GUI boasts an original monotone colour.

Vintage glass: Compatible with non-AI lenses

Df_ambience_5b

 

Taking its dedication to pure photography a step further than any other D-SLR on the market today, the Df boasts a unique collapsible metering coupling lever that enables even vintage non-AI NIKKOR lenses to be attached directly to the camera. Nikon’s lenses are renowned the world over for their optical superiority, and NIKKOR celebrates its 80th anniversary this year. Photographers using the original F-mount NIKKOR lenses broke boundaries, and those same lenses remain well-loved by many today. But it’s never been possible to use them easily with a modern D-SLR, until now.

When shooting with a non-AI lens in A (Aperture Priority) or M (Manual) mode, the Df allows full-aperture metering—equivalent to that of AI lenses. Lens characteristics such as focal length and the widest aperture setting can be easily defined via simple camera settings, enabling the camera to recognise the aperture setting and calculate correct exposure.

Professional-quality still images

The Df’s wealth of cutting-edge image technology ensures still images of the highest possible integrity. Working alongside its formidable image sensor and processing engine, the camera’s highly sensitive AF system and 5.5 frames-per-second frame rate allow even the most unexpected photographic situations to be captured with outstanding precision. Meanwhile, advanced Spot White Balance metering and features such as the dual-axis electronic virtual horizon, high-performance optical viewfinder, and Live View shooting provide valuable freedom of composition.

Highly sensitive autofocus with Multi-CAM 4800 39-point AF system: Sensitive down to -1 EV, compatible with lenses up to f/8, and featuring four AF-area modes (including 3D tracking), the Df’s AF system delivers fast and precise coverage across the frame, even in difficult lighting conditions.

Spot White Balance metering: The Df enables highly accurate manual white balance settings by letting you quickly assign a Spot White Balance to the specific area of the frame you select during Live View shooting.

Scene Recognition System: The camera’s image sensor and its 2,016-pixel RGB sensor provide precise data to the Scene Recognition System, which optimises exposure, autofocus, and white balance immediately before the shutter is released, ensuring sharply defined images.

High-performance optical viewfinder: The glass pentaprism viewfinder offers approximately 100% frame coverage and 0.7x magnification, as well as a DX Crop Mode with viewfinder marking.

Large 8 cm (3.2-in.) 921k-dot LCD monitor with wide-viewing-angle and reinforced glass. Delivers bright, crisp image playback with a wide colour reproduction capacity.

Dual-axis electronic virtual horizon: Roll (horizontal inclination) and pitch (forward or rear inclination) information can be confirmed via the LCD monitor, and roll information via the viewfinder.

Live View: When shooting in Live View, optional assist grid-lines for 1:1 or 16:9 image ratios help with composition, and the contrast-detect AF system boasts enhanced operability, accuracy, and speed. You can also confirm exposure simply by pressing the preview button when shooting in M (Manual) mode.

In-camera tools

No matter which kind of photography you focus on, the Df’s range of creative and practical features can accommodate both your preferred style of shooting and your creative vision.

Quiet Release Mode: Perfect for discreet photography, the sound of the camera’s mirror return mechanism is noticeably reduced during the burst.

Crop Modes: DX format and 5:4 ratio. The DX Crop Mode can be automatically enabled when a DX lens is attached.

HDR (High Dynamic Range) Mode: Shoots one overexposed and one underexposed frame in a single shutter release. The range can be widened by up to ±3 EV for different looks, full of saturation and tonal gradation, while the smoothness of the edge where the two exposures meet can be adjusted for a more natural appearance.

Active D-Lighting: Nikon’s Active D-Lighting automatically retains the details in both dark and bright areas for stunning images with natural contrast when shooting in high-contrast situations.

 Retouch menus: Menus include options to correct red-eye and colour balance, as well as RAW processing and resize options. Filter effects include Skylight, Colour Intensifier and Cross Screen, in addition to Soft filter effects. Quick retouch options include distortion control, perspective control, straighten, and fish-eye.

Picture Controls: Customise the look of your stills by fine-tuning parameters such as sharpness, saturation, and hue before capture.

Nikon system

As an FX-format camera, the Df is fully compatible with Nikon’s extensive range of NIKKOR lenses, and the camera comes packaged together with a special edition of Nikon’s popular AF-S 50mm f/1.8G NIKKOR lens. Now boasting a retro look-and-feel to complement the Df camera body, this lens is one of the most popular primes in the Nikon lineup, thanks to its compact, lightweight build and its fast f/1.8 maximum aperture.

In addition to NIKKOR lenses, Nikon’s vast array of photographic equipment and accessories can help you realise your ideas in countless ways. For photographers who want to get creative with light, Nikon’s industry-leading Creative Lighting System includes a range of versatile Speedlights that offer extensive opportunities for on-camera or wireless flash photography. For image transfer, the Nikon WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter enables photos to be transferred straight from the camera to a smart device; and support for remote shooting comes via Nikon’s WR-R10 Wireless Transceiver and WR-T10 Wireless Transmitter, which let you control key camera functions from a distance even if there are objects between yourself and the camera.

Optional accessories

Exclusive leather straps and cases are available in classic black and brown.

* Approximate measurements are based on CIPA guidelines.